All posts tagged: Jose Rizal

Literary Snobbery Series

The LSS Book List, Part 6

Visit the The LSS Book List page for more information about this post. No One Writes to the Colonel (El coronel no tiene quien le escriba) and Other Stories by Gabriel García Márquez (1961, M) – GGM is famous for magical realism, but that doesn’t mean that he’s only as good as One Hundred Years of Solitude. Try this collection of realist short stories (no insomniac towns, traveling blood, or women rising up to the heavens above) and you’ll realize that the man is indeed a master of the written word. The last story can’t help Noli Me Tangere (Touch Me Not) by José Rizal (1887, H) – I had a little trouble with this entry because this is required reading in Philippine high schools. But this isn’t internationally popular like those European or Latin American or Japanese novels. And how about reading this for pleasure and in a translation other than Filipino (in my case, English)? Or better yet, how about in Spanish? Number9Dream by David Mitchell (2001, M) – Eiji Miyake has never …

TFG’s Year in Posters

2012 is nearly coming to its end. Our book club has even recently finished discussing this year’s last book of the month, which deserves an entirely different post. In the unlikely event that the Mayans got their calculations right, I would like to take this opportunity to sort of honor the lovely event posters that the 12 discussion leaders have prepared in line with the monthly book discussions. Without further ado, here they are. Click the thumbnails to view the large version of the images. Enjoy! Lovely, aren’t they? And just for the sake of fun, what is your favorite poster regardless of the book? Please select one from the list below. It’s my first time to post a poll on my blog (hurrah!) so I would appreciate it if you participate. Thanks! And tada! Here’s our new shiny logo. Credits go to my office mate who shall remain unnamed. He requested not to let people know that he designed this logo. Still, if you, dear office mate, are reading this, a lot of people …

Noli Me Tángere by José Rizal

1896 Revisited – Noli Me Tángere by José Rizal

Back in junior high school, I borrowed my cousin’s red textbook with Jose Rizal’s portrait on the front cover for my Filipino class. It is not his biography, but yes, there are biographical notes that are part of the book’s introduction. We are to read this book, Noli Me Tangere, for the remaining months of that school year. Prior to that, we tackled various literary works in Filipino. These are classic plays and short stories, such as Ang Kuwento ni Mabuti (The Story of Mabuti – Mabuti is translated as Good, but in the story’s context, it is best to retain the Filipino word) by Genoveva Edroza-Matute, Moses, Moses by Rogelio Sikat, Mabangis na Lungsod (Savage City) by Efren Abueg, and Walang Panginoon (Godless) by Deogracias Rosario. I thoroughly enjoyed these, and I thought that they were good materials to prepare us for the reading of probably the single and most quintessential novel that the Philippines will ever produce. Noli Me Tangere, our national hero’s magnum opus, is an important work that it is a required reading in Philippine …

The Greatest Novel of the Philippines

TFG’s Book of the Month for August: Noli Me Tángere by José Rizal

Our country celebrates Buwan ng Wika (Language Month, literally) every August, so our book club made it a point that we nominate Filipino novels for the said month. Of course, the books nominated are obscure to my international readers (heh!), and what do you know? The book that we, as Filipino high school students, were required to read won the polls. A background: Jose Rizal is our country’s national hero. He’s a little bit of everything: a doctor, a linguist, a poet, an essayist, and yes, a novelist. His greatest novel, Noli Me Tangere (Touch Me Not), is his monumental work, a book so powerful that it sparked the Philippine Revolution during the Spanish era in the late 1800s. It was first published in Germany, and its original language is Spanish. It has been translated to many languages, and the edition that we read back in high school was in our language, Filipino. So this time, I read an English translation, one by a fellow Filipino. I’ll stop talking about the novel now for I …

Thirteen Translations

Quarterly Rhapsody: Translated Books

I almost forgot my quarterly feature, which is a post where I ramble about book-related stuff. Previous topics that I discussed in Quarterly Rhapsody, if you are interested, are: why I blog about books, how I rate my books, following book lists, planning the books to be read, and signed books. So for the third quarter of the year, let’s talk about books translated into other languages. This topic has been bothering me for the past couple of weeks, and we have two books to blame: Les Miserables by Victor Hugo and The Tin Drum by Gunter Grass. For the first book, I have this unquenchable desire to immediately read the translation by Lee Fahnestock and Norman MacAfee, but unfortunately, I couldn’t find a copy. As for the second book, I was going to start reading Ralph Manheim’s translation when by some accident, I found out that he made some omissions from the original text. I put it back on my shelf and asked the local book stores if they have the Breon Mitchell translation …