All posts tagged: Gabriel Garcia Marquez

Literary Snobbery Series

The LSS Book List, Part 6

Visit the The LSS Book List page for more information about this post. No One Writes to the Colonel (El coronel no tiene quien le escriba) and Other Stories by Gabriel García Márquez (1961, M) – GGM is famous for magical realism, but that doesn’t mean that he’s only as good as One Hundred Years of Solitude. Try this collection of realist short stories (no insomniac towns, traveling blood, or women rising up to the heavens above) and you’ll realize that the man is indeed a master of the written word. The last story can’t help Noli Me Tangere (Touch Me Not) by José Rizal (1887, H) – I had a little trouble with this entry because this is required reading in Philippine high schools. But this isn’t internationally popular like those European or Latin American or Japanese novels. And how about reading this for pleasure and in a translation other than Filipino (in my case, English)? Or better yet, how about in Spanish? Number9Dream by David Mitchell (2001, M) – Eiji Miyake has never …

Books to Read: August 2013

Books to Read: August 2013

I do not know if it would make any sense to post a reading plan for this month because I have only finished one book for July and I am only adding one new entry. Shame, shame. But for the sake of keeping up with this monthly post, here we go. The Left Stack (books I want to read soon and books I need to read soon): The Collected Stories of Lydia Davis – from June. The History of Love by Nicole Krauss – from July. House of Leaves by Mark Z. Danielewski – from May. A Lover’s Discourse by Roland Barthes – from May. On Chesil Beach by Ian McEwan – from July. Steps by Jerzy Kosinski – from July. Tall Story by Candy Gourlay – our book of the month. Will You Please Be Quiet, Please? by Raymond Carver – from July. The Right Stack (books I have finished and books I have yet to finish): Great Expectations by Charles Dickens – from June. Currently on page 191. Infinite Jest by David Foster Wallace – from May. Currently on page 258. Les Miserables …

F2F19: Love in the Time of Cholera by Gabriel García Márquez

TFG’s Book of the Month for July: Love in the Time of Cholera by Gabriel García Márquez

Love in the Time of Cholera Face to Face Book Discussion Details: Date: July 27, 2013 Place: Gayuma ni Maria, Sikatuna Village, Quezon City Time: 3 PM to 7 PM Discussion Leaders: Bennard and Rhena Attendees: Me, Aaron, Aldrin (with girlfriend May), Alexa, Berna, Camille, Cary, Chika, Emir, Gay (newbie), Ingrid, JL, Mae, Mavic, Monique, Patrick, Pauline (my first recruit; with Alyanna), Ranee, Sheryl, Tina, Veronica, Ycel Food I Ate: Please Be Careful with My Heart (baked chicken with lemon and garlic), Beats Sex Anyday (chocolate cake), I Love My Banana (banana cake), Twisted Pavlova (I stole bites of the three cakes from my seatmates) Post-discussion Activity: Sharing of short anecdotes about love. Enough said. After the Book Discussion: Bookay-Ukay, then dinner and beer at Tomato Kick. Other Nominated Books: The History of Love by Nicole Krauss and The Unbearable Lightness of Being by Milan Kundera Thoughts from the Members: [From Anna:] What I love about this book is its ability to establish the love story, without having the romantic lines. I hate romance books. Love can be everywhere. But this …

Books to Read: July 2013

Books to Read: July 2013

Here are my July reading plans and my June accomplishment report: The Left Stack (books I want to read soon and books I need to read soon): The Collected Stories of Lydia Davis – from June. The History of Love by Nicole Krauss – it almost won the book of the month for our book club. House of Leaves by Mark Z. Danielewski – from May. Love in the Time of Cholera by Gabriel García Márquez – our book of the month. A Lover’s Discourse by Roland Barthes – from May. On Chesil Beach by Ian McEwan – I want to read something short. Steps by Jerzy Kosinski – this is another short work, which resembles a collection of short stories. Will You Please Be Quiet, Please? by Raymond Carver – a legit collection of short stories. The Right Stack (books I have finished and books I have yet to finish): The Curious Case of Benjamin Button by F. Scott Fitzgerald – from June. 3 out of 5 stars. Dom Casmurro by Machado de Assis – from May. 4 …

No One Writes to the Colonel and Other Stories by Gabriel Garcí­a Márquez

Unmagical Realism – No One Writes to the Colonel and Other Stories by Gabriel Garcí­a Márquez

No One Writes to the Colonel and Other Stories consists of one novella, which is the title story, and eight other ones. These are dense with the seemingly insignificant lives of people living in a South American village. The unnamed villagers, each portrayed separately among the stories, are portrayed as despondent people who could either be hanging on to hope or resigned to utter hopelessness. After every story, the mood seems to get bleaker, but the compassionate writing of one of South America’s best writers makes the reader go until the end. Readers familiar with the Nobel laureate’s books, particularly One Hundred Years of Solitude, will find this a strange departure from the regular Marquez oeuvre. Elements from the school of magic realism are rarely found and, in fact, only present in one of the stories. Readers who are looking for those must prepare themselves to prevent disappointment, but this collection will not go as far as that. Cross out magic and you get realism. People and places are depicted as they are seen by the …