Whatnot
Comments 22

And the winner of our bloggy birthday guessing game contest…

Four

…will be announced after we read the entries. This year, we have eight. We see familiar names and new names (hello there). I usually disqualify first-time commenters because I don’t feel like giving a book to a stranger, but hey, let’s try something new this year to rev up the competition. Anyway, here are the entries, in the order that they were submitted (will also add my comments on the guesses.

themisanthropologist (January 7, 2015 at 7:35 AM, January 7, 2015 at 8:41 AM)

  1. Ender’s Game by Orson Scott Card – Almost everyone has read this.
  2. The Left Hand of Darkness by Ursula K. Le Guin – In the longlist.
  3. Stranger in a Strange Land by Robert A. Heinlein – Considered the author’s works.
  4. Dune by Frank Herbert – Considered the author’s works.
  5. The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams – This is March 2012’s book of the month.
  6. Do Androids Dream Electric Sheep? by Philip K. Dick – In the longlist.
  7. Foundation by Isaac Asimov – Considered the author’s works.
  8. A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess – I feel that this is less of a sci-fi novel and more of a transgressive/psychological novel.
  9. A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L’Engle – Isn’t this a children’s/middle-grade book?
  10. Brave New World by Aldous Huxley – A bit like 1984, which was already discussed.

fictionalforevers (January 7, 2015 at 8:37 AM)

  1. 1984 by George Orwell – This is January 2012’s book of the month.
  2. Ender’s Game by Orson Scott Card – see above.
  3. Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut – I feel that this is less of a sci-novel and more of a philosophical novel.

Monique (January 7, 2015 at 10:18 AM)

  1. Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut – see above.
  2. Foundation by Isaac Asimov – see above.
  3. The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood – The author doesn’t want to be labeled as a sci-fi writer.
  4. The Left Hand of Darkness by Ursula K. Le Guin – In the longlist.
  5. Brave New World by Aldous Huxley – see above.
  6. Snow Crash by Neal Stephenson – In the longlist.
  7. Dune by Frank Herbert – see above.
  8. A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess – see above.
  9. The Drowned World by J. G. Ballard – Considered the author’s works.
  10. Ender’s Game by Orson Scott Card – see above.

Meliza (January 7, 2015 at 12:54 PM)

  1. Station Eleven by Emily St. John Mandel – I tend to shy away from recently published books for a book of the month selection.
  2. Neuromancer by William Gibson – In the longlist.
  3. A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess – see above.
  4. Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut – see above.
  5. Snow Crash by Neal Stephenson – In the longlist.
  6. White Noise by Don DeLillo – I feel that this is too literary for a sci-fi read.
  7. The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood – see above.
  8. The Food of the Gods by H. G. Wells – Other work in the longlist.
  9. Brave New World by Aldous Huxley – see above.
  10. Ubik by Philip K. Dick – In the longlist.

Lynai (January 7, 2015 at 3:55 PM)

  1. Ender’s Game by Orson Scott Card – see above.
  2. Dune by Frank Herbert – see above.
  3. The Time Machine by H. G. Wells – Other work in the longlist.
  4. The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood – see above.
  5. Flowers for Algernon by Daniel Keyes – Considered the author’s works.
  6. Babel-17 by Samuel R. Delany – Other work in the longlist.
  7. The Dispossessed by Ursula K. Le Guin – In the longlist.
  8. The Graveyard Book by Neil Gaiman – Isn’t this a children’s/middle-grade book?
  9. The Yiddish Policemen’s Union by Michael Chabon – I did not consider this.

the boomerang kid (January 8, 2015 at 12:34 PM)

  1. Dune by Frank Herbert – see above.
  2. Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury – This is January 2013’s book of the month.
  3. Starship Troopers by Robert A. Heinlein – Considered the author’s works.
  4. I, Robot by Isaac Asimov – Considered the author’s works.
  5. Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? by Philip K. Dick – In the longlist.

Louize (January 10, 2015 at 8:17 AM)

  1. Station Eleven by Emily St. John Mandel – see above.
  2. Annihilation by Jeff Vandermeer – Same comment with Station Eleven.

Tin (January 10, 2015 at 8:17 PM)

  1. Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut – see above.
  2. The Sparrow by Mary Doria Russell – I don’t know this title and I appreciate its relative obscurity.
  3. The Food of the Gods by H.G. Wells – Other work in the longlist.
  4. The Martian by Andy Weir – Same comment with Station Eleven.
  5. Station Eleven by Emily St. John – see above.
  6. The Left Hand of Darkness by Ursula K. LeGuin – In the longlist.
  7. A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess – see above.
  8. The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood – see above.
  9. Brave New World Aldous Huxley – see above.
  10. 2001: A Space Odyssey by Arthur C. Clarke – Other work in the longlist.

Here’s the longlist:

  1. Childhood’s End by Arthur C. Clarke
  2. Dhalgren by Samuel R. Delany
  3. The Dispossessed by Ursula K. Le Guin
  4. Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? by Philip K. Dick
  5. Inverted World by Christopher Priest
  6. The Left Hand of Darkness by Ursula K. Le Guin
  7. Neuromancer by William Gibson
  8. Snow Crash by Neal Stephenson
  9. Ubik by Philip K. Dick
  10. The War of the Worlds by H. G. Wells

And finally, here’s a screenshot of the shortlist:

My Science Fiction Shortlist

My Science Fiction Shortlist

As you can since, the last edit of this note is dated January 7, 12:03 AM, which is just about the time that I posted the contest announcement. If you’ve done the math, the winner should be known by now. But let’s break it down for those who simply scanned this post. Four participants have one hit each: themisanthropolgist, Monique, and Tin for The Left Hand of Darkness, and Meliza for Ubik. And now, let’s cue in a drum roll: the winner is themisanthropologist! Congratulations, you win for guessing one title correctly and for posting the earliest (yep, that’s the tie-breaker)! Please post the book of your choice (at most Php 1,000 or USD 20.00) in the comments section.

Thank you so much for participating and may we all have a fun reading year ahead.

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22 Comments

    • Monique says

      Congrats, H! :)

      Buddy: Ang orte lang ni Margie Atwood. E sci-fi naman talaga ang Handmaid’s Tale. Hahaha. Para bang si Ishi, sci-fi-ish naman talaga ang Never Let Me Go. Has anyone called him a sci-fi writer? :))

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    • Thanks!

      Hmm I don’t know, I also don’t consider Margaret Atwood a Sci-fi writer….I also don’t really consider A Handmaid’s Tale sci-fi. Same goes for A Clockwork Orange. I was surprised the first time I saw A Clockwork Orange in a sci-fi list.

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    • Do you want to read her? I don’t know whether I like her or not. I’ve read 2 of her novels but I didn’t exactly find them all that great or unforgettable.

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    • Monique says

      When I read A Handmaid’s Tale I didn’t think it was sci-fi. And then I read someone say that it is, so I considered the sci-fi elements in it. But then again, we all differ in the ways we categorize books into genres. Like someone including The Graveyard Book in his list and Angus asking if it shouldn’t be considered as middle grade. I read in a recent list pa nga (on Flavorwire yata?) na the Harry Potter books are sci-fi. Huwat. :))

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    • Hahaha well, I think Graveyard Book is a children’s book too, and so is Harry Potter, but I don’t think it’s sci-fi. Maybe it’s because sci-fi and fantasy get lumped together so sometimes people say something is sci-fi when they really mean fantasy.

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